Weekly Roundup

Employees are happier after a workday containing smartphone “microbreaks,” which likely offer an equivalent benefit to coffee breaks, short walks, or water-cooler chatter with coworkers.

A new study in PLOS ONE reveals the scientific 1%: the 150,608 scientists who published a paper every year between 1996 and 2011 (a group described as having an “uninterrupted, continuous presence” in the literature) are immensely prolific, listed as authors in 41.7% of journal articles and in 87.1% of papers with more than 1000 citations during the period. [via Urban Demographics]

Your happiness and mental well-being may depend on your genetic proximity to Denmark. Hamlet, Ophelia et al. might disagree.

A newly-discovered pontarachnid mite has been named after Jennifer LopezLitarachna lopezae was so named by the international team of researchers because they enjoyed Lopez’s music while preparing their manuscript, recently published in ZooKeys.

In honour of the 45th anniversary of NASA’s Apollo 11 lunar landing, here’s space historian Amy Shira Teitel explaining the contingency plan if the moonwalking astronauts had been stranded on the lunar surface. Teitel is also “live”-tweeting the Apollo 11 mission’s timeline over the next few days. Scientific American discussed whether the Apollo landing sites ought to be protected for their historical importance. And this week NASA made a bold announcement at a panel on the search for extraterrestrial life, claiming to be “very, very close in terms of technology and science to actually finding the other Earth and our chance to find signs of life on another world.”

i09 offers some of the most peculiar historical quotations about science from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Do not click this link unless you’re prepared to be exposed to a thought experiment the very consideration of which may bring about a malevolent and grudge-holding AI singularity.

A lecturer at Kalasin Rajabhat University in Thailand was caught on tape offering higher grades for coupon-stamps from 7-11, and has been suspended pending an investigation. However, the students involved have recanted and, contrary to evidence on video, claim the exchange was their idea and that the stamps were handed in for charity.

It’s not your imagination; the other checkout lines ARE moving faster than yours. To explain why, you need some queueing theory.

Circadian rhythms are a trending topic: a study titled “The Morality of Larks and Owls” found that both early risers and night owls are most prone to immoral behaviour when fighting their internal clocks, and researchers have found that insulin may have a regulatory effect on the body’s internal clock, meaning that the future might hold a food-based cure for jet lag.

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