Weekly Roundup

It’s Groundhog Day! Punxsutawney Phil did not see his shadow, according to the interpretations of the Groundhog Club (whose machinations are as mysterious as those of the Nobel Committee). A Canadian groundhog, Shubenacadie Sam, is the best weather groundhog, with 42% accuracy. Sadly, we mourn the loss of one of Canada’s weather-predicting groundhogs, Winnipeg Willow.

Speaking of helpful animals, the Netherlands is training eagles to protect Dutch airspace from malicious drones.

Physicist and science blogger/journalist Sabine Hossenfelder elaborates her call out against sloppy science journalism in this interview in Scientific American’s Cross-Check:

Yes, there is good science journalism. But then there are a lot of outlets that just seem to uncritically repeat press releases or what a scientist told them about their own research. And after one major outlet picked it up, it will appear in a dozen other places, each trying to make a bigger headline than the others. How come we still haven’t confirmed string theory if we’ve read two dozen times that it’s soon going to happen?

Oh good, a mysterious in-flight illness.

Biographical tweets about male scientists as though they were female scientists: His dour personality made everyone think he’d never marry. Even so, Schrödinger got a wife and a Nobel Prize.

“This discovery shows that there is still more to learn about ancient science, and that every new thing we do learn demonstrates just how clever the ancient astronomers were”: Clay tablets containing abstract calculations reveal that Babylonians invented astronomical geometry much earlier than Europeans did.

The truth, which is out there, is also in these real UFO files released by the CIA.

A “lady shark” ate a male tank-dweller at a South Korean aquarium. She was previously seen bopping her husband, Andy Capp, on the head with a rolling pin.

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